If Health Insurance Mandates Are Unconstitutional, Why Did the Founding Fathers Back Them?

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The framers, challengers have claimed, thought a constitutional ban on purchase mandates was too "obvious" to mention. Their core basis for this claim is that purchase mandates are unprecedented, which they say would not be the case if it was understood this power existed.


But there's a major problem with this line of argument: It just isn't true. The founding fathers, it turns out, passed several mandates of their own. In 1790, the very first Congress-which incidentally included 20 framers-passed a law that included a mandate: namely, a requirement that ship owners buy medical insurance for their seamen. This law was then signed by another framer: President George Washington. That's right, the father of our country had no difficulty imposing a health insurance mandate.


That's not all. - Einer Elhauge, The New Republic

See original: Groklaw NewsPicks If Health Insurance Mandates Are Unconstitutional, Why Did the Founding Fathers Back Them?