The Force is strong with this one...

Jeremy McDermond mcdermj at xenotropic.com
Wed Oct 21 14:00:45 PDT 2009


On Oct 19, 2009, at 6:50 PM, Steve Stroh wrote:

> But with the combined forces of Chinese manufacturers' incredibly  
> rapid
> copy-improve-iterate cycle, Google's massive resources, open source
> developers, a wide-open app store, AND Apple and AT&T's continued  
> fumbling
> in allowing, or not, worthy and interesting apps in to the iPhone Apps
> Store...

The problem has always been with Apple stuff that the "copy" process  
doesn't quite get the essence of what's going on, and you get a "good  
enough" sort of thing that isn't really that elegant.  This has been  
part of the problem with the "Linux on the Desktop" crowd, although I  
think part of their problem is that they're so focused on copying  
Windows, that they've lost sight of where they can innovate.  I truly  
hope that Android is a great success, not necessarily because I'll buy  
one, but because I think that drives the rest of the industry, as the  
iPhone has done.  But, as long as Google is concentrating on catching  
up, and not leapfrogging the iPhone, I don't think that's going to  
happen.  The problem right now with what I see about Droid is that  
they're doing the "we have more features" thing that I don't think  
that works well.  The iPhone just *NOW* got MMS, yet it was wildly  
popular before it did.  I think this indicates that the people who are  
buying it aren't looking at the feature lists, they're looking at the  
usability of the thing.  I think the majority of folks don't care  
about the "openness" of the App Store.  There are plenty of apps out  
there, and nobody else really has them.  What I *DO* think is going to  
possibly drive Droid is Verizon's network.  AT&T has been doing a poor  
job of managing the iPhone customers, and I'm even fairly unhappy  
(Disclaimer:  I'm an iPhone 2.5G owner.  Plus, I have 4 or 5 Macs, so  
I'm definitely not unbiased).

Don't get me wrong, I'm not rooting against Droid.  I think if Google  
can put out a good product it will drive the whole segment and keep  
Apple honest about things.  That being said, from what I've seen of  
Android 1.0, it's not ready for prime time.  I hope that Google's  
shepherding will overcome some of the issues that have faced Linux on  
the desktop.

--
Jeremy McDermond (NH6Z)
Xenotropic Systems
mcdermj at xenotropic.com





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